About Us

DHi Team

Angel David Nieves, Ph.D.

Co-Director, Digital Humanities Initiative, Hamilton College
315.859.4125

Angel David Nieves, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y and is Director of the American Studies there.  He is also Co-Director of Hamilton’s Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) which is recognized as a leader among small-liberal arts colleges in the Northeast (see, http://www.dhinitiative.org).  As Co-Director, he has raised over $2.7 million dollars in foundation and institutional support for digital humanities scholarship at Hamilton.  He is also Research Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.  He taught in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at the University of Maryland, College Park, from 2003-2008.  Nieves’s scholarly work and community-based activism critically engage with issues of race and the built environment in cities across the Global South.  His co-edited book “We Shall Independent Be:” African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the U.S. was published in 2008.  He is completing a manuscript entitled, An Architecture of Education: African American Women Design the New South, with the University of Rochester Press for their series “Gender and Race in American History” (forthcoming, 2018).  Nieves is also currently working on a new volume in the Debates in the Digital Humanities Series and on a special collaborative issue of American Quarterly (2018) on DH in the field of American Studies.  He is co-editor (w/Kim Gallon, Purdue) of a new book series at the University of Georgia Press, The Black Spatial Humanities: Theories, Methods, and Praxis in Digital Humanities.  He serves on the Modern Language Association’s (MLA) Committee on Information Technology (2016-2019).  He was most recently appointed to the Board of New York State’s Humanities Council (2017-2020).  His digital research and scholarship have been featured on MSNBC.com and in Newsweek International.His digital scholarship can be found at http://www.apartheidheritages.org

Janet Thomas Simons, M.S.

Co-Director, Digital Humanities Initiative, Hamilton College
315.859.4424

Janet Thomas Simons is Hamilton College's Digital Humanities Initiative Co-Director of Technology and Research. Her responsibilities include oversight and direction of the daily activities of the DHi to develop a collaborative community in which creativity, technology, and innovation lead to new methods of research, learning, and publication. This includes strategic planning in the use of technology, collaboration on grant proposals and budgets, management and communication of DHi projects, coordination and teaching of DHi's undergraduate research fellowship program CLASS and creation of direct connections between DHi projects and the curriculum. She is engaged in faculty outreach and development; project management; identification and research of technologies appropriate to research projects and learning goals; and coordination of academic support services to meet teaching, learning, and research needs.  Janet is involved in the development of sustainable digital scholarship infrastructure and models for support of digital humanities projects at liberal arts institutions. She recently collaborated with over 23 liberal arts colleges to develop the Institute for Liberal Arts Scholarship (ILiADS.org). She co-teaches “Models for liberal arts and four year colleges at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (dhsi.org). Janet has presented regionally and internationally on learning design, collaboration, media scholarship, and models for digital scholarship. Janet has co-authored articles in the Journal of Political Science Education, Educause Quarterly, and Collaborations in Liberal Arts Colleges in Support of Digital HumanitiesJanet holds an M.S. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. @janettsimons

 

Twitter Name: 
janettsimons

Gregory Lord

Lead Designer & Software Engineer, Hamilton College

Gregory Lord is DHi's Lead Designer and Software Engineer, leading the creation of the varied web and graphic designs that represent DHi, and lending his skills as a web programmer to the design and implementation of its digital projects as part of DHi's Collection Development Team.  Prior to his work at Hamilton and DHi, Greg began his work in the digital humanities at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) in 2005, and continued to develop his design and programming skills as a freelance web developer and small independent business owner from his home state of Maryland.

Greg holds a BA in English from the University of Maryland, where he studied creative writing, focusing his design and programming background upon the creation of digital and interactive hypertext literature.  

A lifelong gaming enthusiast and advocate of educational gaming and simulation, Greg currently works with Hamilton students and DHi's CLASS program, teaching a variety of multimedia topics including video game narrative, game design, 3D modeling and animation, and games/simulation programming.

Peter MacDonald

Library Information Systems Specialist, Hamilton College

Peter MacDonald has 25 years of experience working in academic libraries at The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Harvard Law School and currently at Hamilton College. At Harvard he developed the Web display mechanism for the Nuremberg Trials papers. He is currently the Library Information Systems Specialist at Hamilton College (Clinton, New York) where he manages the library's digital collections, which includes over 2,000 TEI-encoded pages of Civil War letters and 8,000 TEI-encoded pages of a 19th-Century Shaker journal. Peter is also a member of the “TAPAS: Publishing TEI Documents for Small Liberal Arts Colleges" which is a grant-funded project to develop an interactive interface for scholars who use or generate TEI-encoded documents in their research. His main roles in the DHi initiative will be to promote the use of TEI-encoding in scholarly activity on campus and consult on metadata issues.

Lisa McFall

Metadata and Digital Initiatives Librarian, Hamilton College
Lisa McFall is the Metadata and Digital Initiative Librarian at Hamilton College. She is responsible for overseeing metadata creation for the library’s projects, maintaining consistent metadata across collections, assisting with building projects in Shared Shelf, helping with Hamilton's Institutional Repository, and serving on the DHi Collection Development Team. In her role as a consultant to DHi, Lisa assists in developing metadata guidelines and best practices both broadly for DHi and at the individual project level, and also serves as an advisor to faculty and students who are creating metadata for projects.
 
Her recent publications include, “Beyond the Back Room: The Role of Metadata and Catalog Librarians in Digital Humanities” in Supporting Digital Humanities for Knowledge Acquisition in Modern Libraries (IGI Global, 2015) and “Collaborations in Liberal Arts Colleges in Support of Digital Humanities” (co-authored with Janet Thomas Simons, Gregory Lord, Angel David Nieves, Peter MacDonald, and Steve Young) in Technology-Centered Academic Library Partnerships and Collaborations (IGI Global, 2016). She has also presented her work at the American Library Association Annual Meeting, the Keystone Digital Humanities Conference, and as an invited speaker of the “Conversations in Digital Scholarship” series at the University of Connecticut.
 
Lisa holds the degrees of Bachelor of Music in Music Education from SUNY Fredonia, Master of Library and Information Science from the University of Pittsburgh and Master of Arts in Ethnomusicology, also from the University of Pittsburgh.

Steve Young

ITS Network Services Unix/HPC System Administrator, Hamilton College

Steve Young is a Unix/HPC System Administrator within the ITS's Network Services Team at Hamilton College. His responsibilities are primarily managing the Unix based High Performance Computing (HPC) clusters for the College. Chemistry, Biology, Psychology, Economics, and Physics have active research programs requiring HPC resources at Hamilton. Steve has 20 years experience working with Unix based systems and open source software.

Steve is a member of Hamilton's Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) Collection Development team. In this role, he builds and maintains the network infrastructure for DHi and also collaborates with software consultants to develop research services. Most recently, he has been working with Discovery Garden consultants to install and configure Fedora Commons and Islandora on DHi servers.

Before coming to Hamilton in 2004, Steve worked in the private sector at a web hosting solutions provider. He helped manage web and database servers for customers like John's Hopkins University, America's Job Bank (Dept. of Labor), Guggenheim Museum, NOAA, and Denver Bronco's to name a few. He holds an A.A.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology (SUNY Canton) and a BA in Computer Science (SUNY Oswego).

DHi Students

Victoria Anibarro - Class of 2019

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Victoria is in the class of 2019 at Hamilton College. She is an Anthropology major and a Biology minor from Chicago. She joined DHi as a sophomore, and is hoping to use what she learns to further her career in Anthropology as she pursues graduate school.

Alex Cadet - Class of 2017

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Alex is in the class of 2017 at Hamilton College. His interdisciplinary major (Technology & Society) explores how technology and society shape each other. He joined the DHi during his sophomore year and has worked on various DHi projects. Through his work with the DHi, Alex is hoping to gain new perspectives on how digital technology and user experience intersect.

Clara Cho - Class of 2020

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Clara Cho is a member of the class of 2020 from Summit, New Jersey. She plans to be a history major, and loves playing ultimate frisbee with the Hamilton Hot Saucers team. She joined DHi as a freshman, and is currently working with the American Prison Writing Archive. Clara is hoping to further develop her organizational skills, and to learn more about the digital humanities as a whole. In her downtime, Clara enjoys reading, baking, and running.

Nat Colburn - Class of 2018

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Nathaniel Colburn '18 is a creative writing major and computer science minor from Laguna Beach, California. He is excited to begin exploring the infinity of uses for interactive media, especially video games, starting with the Soweto Historical GIS Project. He will learn the technical skills to bring such projects to fruition and aims to become an adept at 3D modeling, coding, and other nuts and bolts. For fun, he surfs (assuming there is an ocean nearby), reads, and games. 

Hoang Do - Class of 2017

DHi Class Scholar, Hamilton College

Hoang Do ’17 is a Cinema and New Media Studies major at Hamilton College. Hoang is working with Professor Kyoko Omori on the Crossroads in Context short film as a videographer, video editor, and creative consultant. The film documents refugees’ involvement in ESL classes in Utica NY, thereby narrating an aspect of their assimilation into American society. Hoang also helped design the Comparative Japanese Film Archive’s interface during the Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship (ILiADS) conference, which took place in summer 2015 at Hamilton College. Learning from his experience with Crossroads in Context, Hoang intends to create his own documentary film about the Karen Burmese refugees in Utica. He aims to approach the project on a personal level through recording the daily life of a single Karen refugee, believing that the microcosm of a person’s journey can be telling of macro trends.

Hoang's student reflections essay can be found at: http://dhinitiative.org/students/class/do

Mackenzie Doherty - Class of 2018

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Mackenzie is a member of the Class of 2018 from Worcester, MA. She is majoring in Creative Writing and minoring in Government and Women's Studies. She plays softball, club soccer, and club basketball. Mackenzie is working on the Beloved Witness project, a digital archive of the personal writings, readings, and manuscripts of Kashmiri-American poet Agha Shahid Ali. In her involvement with the DHi, she hopes to explore how technology may not only further our understanding of textuality, but actually have the power to forge relationships between creative scholarship and the public.

Samantha Donohue - Class of 2018

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Samantha is a member of the class of 2018 from Summit, New Jersey.  She is majoring in Cinema and Media Studies and Creative Writing. She joined the DHi as a sophomore and is currently working on the Soweto project, mapping a timeline of the Mandela House. She hopes to learn more of the technical skills necessary to pursue her passion for storytelling through the Soweto project and through future work on the Biko and NOLA projects.

Jessie Dromsky-Reed - Class of 2019

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Jessie is a sophomore at Hamilton, and is Literature major.  She is from Kinnelon, New Jersey, and is currently working with Professor Serrano as a student research intern at the DHi on the Guaman Poma Arresting Images Project.  This project focuses on an analysis of the relationship between the text and the images in Guaman Poma's book Nueva corónica y buen gobierno.  As a student of Spanish, Jessie is particularly excited to study the text of this book, which focuses on the impact of colonization on the Incan and Andean way of life. In her free time, Jessie can be found playing her French horn or the piano, or dancing at the ballet studio.  

Petra Elfström

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Petra Elfström is a Creative Writing and Archaeology double major at Hamilton College. She sings in an a cappella group on campus, and often draws and travels with her family in her free time. Combining her love of art and writing with her passion for archaeology, Petra is now working alongside Professor Nathan Goodale and Alissa Nauman to create a short educational film with the aim to present the archaeological practice of the Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project to the general public in an accessible manner. Though the Slocan Narrows site is open to the public and presents its findings every year at a “public day,” the Project was still lacking an informational film that showed the complete archaeological process of the site, including lab analyses and senior theses and not just the field work. They are now working with the DHi to fill this gap in a creative and educational manner. Petra will work on script-writing, creating story-boards, and organizing the different assets already available to include in the film. In addition, Petra will be helping with filming and editing the documentary. She looks forward to increasing her knowledge of filmography as well as her familiarity with the Slocan Narrows site and the culture that it represents.

Matt Goon - Class of 2018

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Matt Goon is a member of the class of 2018 from New Jersey. He is a Computer Science major with interests in many other disciplines including Anthropology, Cinema and New Media Studies, Digital Arts, Economics, and History. He currently works with Dr. Angel Nieves and Greg Lord on DHi's interactive media, 3D modeling, and virtual environment projects, including Blender and Unity-related tasks. He hopes to apply many of the skills practiced and acquired at DHi to life after college.

Jack Hay - Class of 2019

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Jack Hay is a member of the class of 2019 from Essex, Massachusetts.  Jack is a Computer Science major and is working with Dr. Nieves on the Soweto project.  He has experience in the field of computer-aided design and architecture as well as coding.  His work includes the modeling of houses in ArchiCAD. Jack hopes to work as a software engineer after his time at Hamilton.

Shirley Luo - Class of 2017

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Shirley is a member of the class of 2017 from Orange, CT. She is a Public Policy major with minors in Environmental Studies and Jurisprudence, Law and Justice Studies. She joined the DHi team in January to read and process essay submissions for the American Prison Writing Archive, led by Professor Doran Larson.

Hannah McLean - Class of 2019

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Hannah is a member of the class of 2019 from a tiny town in Southwest Iowa. Since spring of her sophomore year she’s been the Office Manager at the DHi, helping to keep everyone (especially Janet) organized and running smoothly. At Hamilton, she’s majoring in Creative Writing and minoring in History and Theatre. She’s fascinated by all types of storytelling, particularly those that use interactive media and emerging technologies such as Virtual Reality.

Alexa Merriam - Class of 2018

DHi Class Scholar, Hamilton College

Alexa Merriam is a Creative Writing major and Music minor at Hamilton College. She designed an original dHi project that fuses her passions for experimental storytelling, spirituality, and nature. Her semester in the Hamilton Adirondack Program has further enhanced her project. In collaboration with Director of the Adirondack Program, Professor Janelle Schwartz, and DHi, she is exploring literature that gives insight into so-called “paranormal” phenomena and engaging with the Adirondack community to gather personal accounts and determine what makes the Adirondacks so conducive for spiritual experiences and practices, -- ranging from meditation to astral projection. Alexa is creating an interactive fiction platform inspired by what she has learned and by her own and others' spiritual journeys. Digital media can best represent the sensory elements of accounts that transcend words. By representing a story in the realest way possible, Alexa aims to emphasize the value that obscure subjects like energy healing, astrology, and parapsychology should have in academia. 

Alexa's reflections blog can be found at: http://amerriam.dhinitiative.org/

Amarilys Milian - Class of 2020

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Amarilys is a HEOP scholar from Miami and hopes to concentrate in Biology and Hispanic studies. She teaches Spanish at the local elementary school and is a part of the sidekick program. Amarilys also participates with the Outing club on various trips and is on the Trop Sol dance team which focuses on various styles of Latin dance such as bachata, salsa, meringue, tango and many more.  Amarilys is currently working with Professor Nhora Serrano of the Literature department on the Arresting Andean Images: Guaman Poma & Visual Editorialization project which focuses on Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala’s book “El primer nueva crónica y buen gobierno.” This is a letter written around 1615 to the king of Spain, Phillip the third with over 300 drawings depicting his messages and holds one of the few accounts we have today of Inca civilization and the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards. In this project, Amarilys is analyzing the relationships between image and text and bringing them to life by creating 2-D animations of several images within the book. She hopes to bring more accessibility and understanding of this Colonial Latin American text through this project. 

Amarilys Milian - 2020

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Amarilys is a HEOP scholar from Miami and hopes to concentrate in Biology and Hispanic studies. She teaches Spanish at the local elementary school and is a part of the sidekick program. Amarilys also participates with the Outing club on various trips and is on the Trop Sol dance team which focuses on various styles of Latin dance such as bachata, salsa, meringue, tango and many more.  Amarilys is currently working with Professor Nhora Serrano of the Literature department on the Arresting Andean Images: Guaman Poma & Visual Editorialization project which focuses on Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala’s book “El primer nueva crónica y buen gobierno.” This is a letter written around 1615 to the king of Spain, Phillip the third with over 300 drawings depicting his messages and holds one of the few accounts we have today of Inca civilization and the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards. In this project, Amarilys is analyzing the relationships between image and text and bringing them to life by creating 2-D animations of several images within the book. She hopes to bring more accessibility and understanding of this Colonial Latin American text through this project. 

Terri Moise - Class of 2017

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Hailing from Miami, Terri is a member of the class of 2017. An Africana Studies major, Terri is working with Professor Nieves on the Soweto Historical GIS Project. He joined the DHi his junior year in order to learn more about the intersections of technology and history, and how he can utilize his writing skills to share the stories of others. For fun, he likes to unpack the various messages present in Japanese anime and write poetry.

Gabriella Pico - Class of 2016

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Gabriella Pico is a rising junior and Public Policy Major at Hamilton College. As an American of Cuban descent, the issues of Cuban and Cuban-American women have interested her for many years. In collaboration with Professor Vivyan Adair, the Emerson Grant program, and the DHi, she will be exploring literature and photography by Cuban-American women in an effort to understand how these two cultures influence these women at the micro and meso levels. Gabriella will be using the skills she has learned in exploring and analyzing the intersections of culture, class, and race in these women’s writings. Her research will culminate in a written analysis which she will contribute to an ongoing digital platform in collaboration with Lafayette College’s DHi. This platform aims to make information more accessible to those scholars who, due to structural economic inequalities, find themselves outside of the academy, and unable to engage with scholarly material.

Will Rasenberger

DHi Class Scholar, Hamilton College

Will Rasenberger is a philosophy major and government minor whose interests include identity formation, political theory, and the theory behind just public policy. He plans to study law following his matriculation from Hamilton College. In addition to his work with the DHI, he is treasurer of the Hamilton College Law Society, and a tutor with Hamilton Reads. His long time interest in social justice and especially hearing the voice of historically silenced groups has led him to collaborate with Professor Larson on his American Prison Writing Archive project. The archive, which is growing all the time, houses essays written by American prisoners, their family members, and correctional officers. Will is responsible, along with student interns, for selecting essays to be archived, collecting metadata about these essays, and transcribing them. Professor Larson's recent grant from the NEH will enable this project to branch out over the coming years in currently unforeseeable ways. Will is looking forward to the summer, when he will stay up at Hamilton College and continue to help grow, modernize, and expand the reach of the American Prison Writing Archive. Will hopes to gain valuable knowledge of data accumulation and how to leverage data--and digital humanities in general-- to pursue worthy social justice objectives. 

Will Rasenberger - 2018

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Will Rasenberger is a philosophy major and government minor whose interests include identity formation, political theory, and the theory behind just public policy. He plans to study law following his matriculation from Hamilton College. In addition to his work with the DHI, he is treasurer of the Hamilton College Law Society, and a tutor with Hamilton Reads. His long time interest in social justice and especially hearing the voice of historically silenced groups has led him to collaborate with Professor Larson on his American Prison Writing Archive project. The archive, which is growing all the time, houses essays written by American prisoners, their family members, and correctional officers. Will is responsible, along with student interns, for selecting essays to be archived, collecting metadata about these essays, and transcribing them. Professor Larson's recent grant from the NEH will enable this project to branch out over the coming years in currently unforeseeable ways. Will is looking forward to the summer, when he will stay up at Hamilton College and continue to help grow, modernize, and expand the reach of the American Prison Writing Archive. Will hopes to gain valuable knowledge of data accumulation and how to leverage data--and digital humanities in general-- to pursue worthy social justice objectives.

Baillie Riggs - Class of 2020

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Baillie Riggs is a freshman at Hamilton College, who hopes to double major in Chinese and Religious Studies. She joined the DHi the second semester of her freshman year. She currently assists Professor Bartle on the Refugee Project, gathering interviews and information on refugees in the nearby city of Utica. She hopes to be able to apply what she learns at the DHi to further her knowledge of technology and apply it to life after college.

Jackie Rodriguez - Class of 2020

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Jackie Rodriguez is a sophomore from Orlando, FL majoring in Government and minoring in Anthropology at Hamilton College. She is currently working with Professor John Bartle of the Russian Studies department on The Refugee Project— a project that has been ongoing for multiple years now. The focus of the project is on collecting oral histories of the various refugees settling in Utica, NY and archiving these stories digitally through the means of transcriptions and video. On top of the oral history component of The Refugee Project, Jackie and Professor Bartle are in the midst of sifting through microfilm of Utica’s past Observer Dispatch articles to find any articles related to refugees or the Refugee Center. The project shall result in a digital archive where oral histories and articles can be easily accessed by any scholar pursuing research on Refugees. Passionate about religion, community, and culture, Jackie has found her interests deeply imbedded within the project. She hopes to further her skills in creating and examining metadata as she continues on with her research. 

Jackie's student reflections essay can be found at: http://dhinitiative.org/students/class/rodriguez

Will Royal - Class of 2018

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Will is a member of the Class of 2018, from Concord, Massachusetts. He is a History major, and started work for the DHi this semester. He is currently working on Voices from the Water’s Edge, and has been learning technical video and audio recording skills to apply to the project. Through his work with the DHi, he is hoping to gain valuable knowledge about video recording, in hopes of using them in other projects.

Lindsey Song - Class of 2020

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Lindsey is a member of the class of 2020 from Houston, Texas.  She will most likely be majoring in philosophy or government.  She is currently working with Professor Nhora Serrano in her project: Arresting Andean Images: Guaman Poma & Visual Editorialization. She hopes to take this experience to learn new skills, especially in the analysis of images and 2D and 3D models—which she has never done before.  Lindsey’s favorite things to do are taking naps, hiking, going to the beach, and reading!

Shen Swartout - Class of 2018

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Shen Swartout '18 is a history major and government minor from Denver, Colorado. Her primary area of interest concerns the history of religions. Shen will be working with Professor Wilson of the history department to further develop his website "The Autumnal Sacrifice to Confucius" as a continuation of his study of the cult of Confucius and Confucian ritual. In her time with the DHi, she hopes to establish valuable skills related to videography and 3D modeling. Such skills, along with the ever-evolving world of Digital Humanities, will enhance the ways in which she can apply her love of history to her time at Hamilton and beyond.

Talia Vaughan - Class of 2018

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Talia Vaughan is a member of the class of 2018 from Madison, New Hampshire. She is a Religious Studies major with other interests in Anthropology and History. She started her work with the Digital Humanities Initiative in her sophomore year, working first on the NOLA project, transcribing oral histories for use in the collection. She is currently working with Dr. Nieves on the Soweto Project, completing projects such as a timeline of the Mandela family home, mapping of mine hostels surrounding Johannesburg, South Africa, and beginning work on digitizing and preserving artifacts from Soweto. Through her work with the DHi, Talia is hoping to improve her technology skills in order to explore the possibility of documenting and preserving the voices and concerns of minority groups and individuals.

Laura Whitmer - Class of 2018

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Laura is a member of the class of 2018 and plans to major in Creative Writing with a minor in Art. She works for the Literature and Creative Writing department and joined DHi as a sophomore. Currently, she assists Professor Doran Larson with organizational research and essay transcriptions.

DHi 2017-2018 CLASS Scholars

Victoria Anibarro - Class of 2019

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Victoria is in the class of 2019 at Hamilton College. She is an Anthropology major and a Biology minor from Chicago. She joined DHi as a sophomore, and is hoping to use what she learns to further her career in Anthropology as she pursues graduate school.

Amarilys Milian - Class of 2020

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Amarilys is a HEOP scholar from Miami and hopes to concentrate in Biology and Hispanic studies. She teaches Spanish at the local elementary school and is a part of the sidekick program. Amarilys also participates with the Outing club on various trips and is on the Trop Sol dance team which focuses on various styles of Latin dance such as bachata, salsa, meringue, tango and many more.  Amarilys is currently working with Professor Nhora Serrano of the Literature department on the Arresting Andean Images: Guaman Poma & Visual Editorialization project which focuses on Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala’s book “El primer nueva crónica y buen gobierno.” This is a letter written around 1615 to the king of Spain, Phillip the third with over 300 drawings depicting his messages and holds one of the few accounts we have today of Inca civilization and the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards. In this project, Amarilys is analyzing the relationships between image and text and bringing them to life by creating 2-D animations of several images within the book. She hopes to bring more accessibility and understanding of this Colonial Latin American text through this project. 

Will Rasenberger

DHi Class Scholar, Hamilton College

Will Rasenberger is a philosophy major and government minor whose interests include identity formation, political theory, and the theory behind just public policy. He plans to study law following his matriculation from Hamilton College. In addition to his work with the DHI, he is treasurer of the Hamilton College Law Society, and a tutor with Hamilton Reads. His long time interest in social justice and especially hearing the voice of historically silenced groups has led him to collaborate with Professor Larson on his American Prison Writing Archive project. The archive, which is growing all the time, houses essays written by American prisoners, their family members, and correctional officers. Will is responsible, along with student interns, for selecting essays to be archived, collecting metadata about these essays, and transcribing them. Professor Larson's recent grant from the NEH will enable this project to branch out over the coming years in currently unforeseeable ways. Will is looking forward to the summer, when he will stay up at Hamilton College and continue to help grow, modernize, and expand the reach of the American Prison Writing Archive. Will hopes to gain valuable knowledge of data accumulation and how to leverage data--and digital humanities in general-- to pursue worthy social justice objectives. 

Shen Swartout - Class of 2018

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Shen Swartout '18 is a history major and government minor from Denver, Colorado. Her primary area of interest concerns the history of religions. Shen will be working with Professor Wilson of the history department to further develop his website "The Autumnal Sacrifice to Confucius" as a continuation of his study of the cult of Confucius and Confucian ritual. In her time with the DHi, she hopes to establish valuable skills related to videography and 3D modeling. Such skills, along with the ever-evolving world of Digital Humanities, will enhance the ways in which she can apply her love of history to her time at Hamilton and beyond.

DHi 2016-2017 CLASS Scholars

Petra Elfström

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Petra Elfström is a Creative Writing and Archaeology double major at Hamilton College. She sings in an a cappella group on campus, and often draws and travels with her family in her free time. Combining her love of art and writing with her passion for archaeology, Petra is now working alongside Professor Nathan Goodale and Alissa Nauman to create a short educational film with the aim to present the archaeological practice of the Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project to the general public in an accessible manner. Though the Slocan Narrows site is open to the public and presents its findings every year at a “public day,” the Project was still lacking an informational film that showed the complete archaeological process of the site, including lab analyses and senior theses and not just the field work. They are now working with the DHi to fill this gap in a creative and educational manner. Petra will work on script-writing, creating story-boards, and organizing the different assets already available to include in the film. In addition, Petra will be helping with filming and editing the documentary. She looks forward to increasing her knowledge of filmography as well as her familiarity with the Slocan Narrows site and the culture that it represents.

DHi 2015-2016 CLASS Scholars

Hoang Do - Class of 2017

DHi Class Scholar, Hamilton College

Hoang Do ’17 is a Cinema and New Media Studies major at Hamilton College. Hoang is working with Professor Kyoko Omori on the Crossroads in Context short film as a videographer, video editor, and creative consultant. The film documents refugees’ involvement in ESL classes in Utica NY, thereby narrating an aspect of their assimilation into American society. Hoang also helped design the Comparative Japanese Film Archive’s interface during the Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship (ILiADS) conference, which took place in summer 2015 at Hamilton College. Learning from his experience with Crossroads in Context, Hoang intends to create his own documentary film about the Karen Burmese refugees in Utica. He aims to approach the project on a personal level through recording the daily life of a single Karen refugee, believing that the microcosm of a person’s journey can be telling of macro trends.

Hoang's student reflections essay can be found at: http://dhinitiative.org/students/class/do

Mackenzie Doherty - Class of 2018

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Mackenzie is a member of the Class of 2018 from Worcester, MA. She is majoring in Creative Writing and minoring in Government and Women's Studies. She plays softball, club soccer, and club basketball. Mackenzie is working on the Beloved Witness project, a digital archive of the personal writings, readings, and manuscripts of Kashmiri-American poet Agha Shahid Ali. In her involvement with the DHi, she hopes to explore how technology may not only further our understanding of textuality, but actually have the power to forge relationships between creative scholarship and the public.

Alexa Merriam - Class of 2018

DHi Class Scholar, Hamilton College

Alexa Merriam is a Creative Writing major and Music minor at Hamilton College. She designed an original dHi project that fuses her passions for experimental storytelling, spirituality, and nature. Her semester in the Hamilton Adirondack Program has further enhanced her project. In collaboration with Director of the Adirondack Program, Professor Janelle Schwartz, and DHi, she is exploring literature that gives insight into so-called “paranormal” phenomena and engaging with the Adirondack community to gather personal accounts and determine what makes the Adirondacks so conducive for spiritual experiences and practices, -- ranging from meditation to astral projection. Alexa is creating an interactive fiction platform inspired by what she has learned and by her own and others' spiritual journeys. Digital media can best represent the sensory elements of accounts that transcend words. By representing a story in the realest way possible, Alexa aims to emphasize the value that obscure subjects like energy healing, astrology, and parapsychology should have in academia. 

Alexa's reflections blog can be found at: http://amerriam.dhinitiative.org/

Jackie Rodriguez - Class of 2020

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Jackie Rodriguez is a sophomore from Orlando, FL majoring in Government and minoring in Anthropology at Hamilton College. She is currently working with Professor John Bartle of the Russian Studies department on The Refugee Project— a project that has been ongoing for multiple years now. The focus of the project is on collecting oral histories of the various refugees settling in Utica, NY and archiving these stories digitally through the means of transcriptions and video. On top of the oral history component of The Refugee Project, Jackie and Professor Bartle are in the midst of sifting through microfilm of Utica’s past Observer Dispatch articles to find any articles related to refugees or the Refugee Center. The project shall result in a digital archive where oral histories and articles can be easily accessed by any scholar pursuing research on Refugees. Passionate about religion, community, and culture, Jackie has found her interests deeply imbedded within the project. She hopes to further her skills in creating and examining metadata as she continues on with her research. 

Jackie's student reflections essay can be found at: http://dhinitiative.org/students/class/rodriguez

Talia Vaughan - Class of 2018

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Talia Vaughan is a member of the class of 2018 from Madison, New Hampshire. She is a Religious Studies major with other interests in Anthropology and History. She started her work with the Digital Humanities Initiative in her sophomore year, working first on the NOLA project, transcribing oral histories for use in the collection. She is currently working with Dr. Nieves on the Soweto Project, completing projects such as a timeline of the Mandela family home, mapping of mine hostels surrounding Johannesburg, South Africa, and beginning work on digitizing and preserving artifacts from Soweto. Through her work with the DHi, Talia is hoping to improve her technology skills in order to explore the possibility of documenting and preserving the voices and concerns of minority groups and individuals.

DHi 2014-2015 CLASS Scholars

Jack Lyons - Class of 2016

Jack Lyons - Class of 2016

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Jack Lyons is a rising junior, and is majoring in Asian Studies with a Japanese focus. Since childhood, he has had a profound interest in Japanese culture, especially Samurai.Following this interest, Jack is working with Professor Kyoko Omori on the Japanese silent film, Orochi (1925) & Benshi artists project. For the project, Jack will construct a narrative script in English for the Japanese silent movie, Orochi, and will analyze certain aspects of the movie like its cinematography and the Japanese culture presented in the movie. In addition, Jack will also help create a documentary on the Clinton area that will be used in a workshop this Fall. During the workshop, Hamilton students will be able to create and recite their own Benshi script for the documentary. Jack aims to not only further his knowledge of the Japanese language and culture through this project, but also to learn more about film and how it is created. Hamilton News http://www.hamilton.edu/news/story/the-silent-serpent-understanding-the-role-of-benshi-in-japanese-cinema

Gabriella Pico - Class of 2016

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Gabriella Pico is a rising junior and Public Policy Major at Hamilton College. As an American of Cuban descent, the issues of Cuban and Cuban-American women have interested her for many years. In collaboration with Professor Vivyan Adair, the Emerson Grant program, and the DHi, she will be exploring literature and photography by Cuban-American women in an effort to understand how these two cultures influence these women at the micro and meso levels. Gabriella will be using the skills she has learned in exploring and analyzing the intersections of culture, class, and race in these women’s writings. Her research will culminate in a written analysis which she will contribute to an ongoing digital platform in collaboration with Lafayette College’s DHi. This platform aims to make information more accessible to those scholars who, due to structural economic inequalities, find themselves outside of the academy, and unable to engage with scholarly material.

Lauren Scutt - Class of 2016

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Lauren Scutt is a member of the class of 2017, and is double majoring in Religious Studies and Psychology. Alongside Professor Abhishek Amar, Lauren has been working on the “Sacred Centers in India” project. Specifically, Lauren has spent time organizing and updating the metadata for Sacred Centers’ archive. Independently, Lauren is researching the psychological benefits of funerary rituals (particularly, Gaya-based, sraddha) in confronting the death of loved ones and ones’ self. DHi has provided Lauren with an opportunity to further develop her research skills and better present her findings in the digital age.  Her second CLASS summer was as an intern at the British Museum working with Professor Michael Willis on the Beyond Boundaries: Religion, Region, Language and the State project. Lauren has presented aspects of her research with Professor Amar at Bucknell's Digital Scholarship Conference 2014 and at the Undergraduate Network for Research in the Humanities at Davidson College 2015. Scutt describes her experiences in this reflection paper.

Lauren's student reflection essay can be found at: http://dhinitiative.org/students/class/scutt

Lainie Smith - Class of 2016

DHi Student Intern, Hamilton College

Lainie Smith is a sophomore at Hamilton College. She is originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. She is concentrating in Creative Writing and minoring in Religious Studies. As an intern with the Digital Humanities Initiative, she is working with Professor Abhishek Amar on his “Sacred Centers” project. By working with DHi, Lainie hopes to hone her skills in communications and research and apply her knowledge of innovative digital technology to represent creative ideas.Hamilton News http://www.hamilton.edu/news/story/smith-16-studies-the-practice-of-meditation

DHi 2013-2014 CLASS Scholars

Kerri Grimaldi - Class of 2015

DHi CLASS Scholar, Hamilton College

Kerri Grimaldi is an English major at Hamilton College. As a DHi CLASS scholar, she is working with Professor Patricia O'Neill on The Beloved Witness project--a collaborative digital archive featuring the works of Kashmiri American poet, Agha Shahid Ali. Kerri is utilizing the archive to study the influence of Emily Dickinson's poetry on Shahid's. Kerri's work developed from her interest in the discourse formed between the works of the two poets, evident through Shahid's references to Dickinson. With the skills obtained during her year in DHi's CLASS program, she is exploring text analysis tools and creating a digital presentation of her research to visually present the intertextual relationship between Shahid’s poetry and Dickinson’s.  See Kerri's website and interpretative video.  Kerri's Summer 2014 off-campus internship was in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) directed by Ray Siemens at the Universtiy of Victoria. Hamilton News - DH 2014 Conference Poster Presentation by Grimaldi and Simons